DuFour Advertising, Sheboygan
The Making of a Pop Up
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Ever wonder how a pop up book is made?

Get a glimpse inside the unique world of pop up book design & production

FOLLOW THE JOURNEY OF THIS ANNUAL REPORT FROM IDEA THRU REALIZATION
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OUR BOOK BECOMES PART OF THE SMITHSONIAN MUSEUM’S COLLECTION
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5 LESSONS FROM 2011’S BEST ANNUAL REPORT BY NELL MINOW
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Pop Up Book, ACUITY

Take the Tour with Bo Peep

1. An Idea
An Idea
1. An Idea

The first step is always an idea. Once it was decided to move forward with the spread concept of Little Bo Peep, the art director and illustrator generated concept drawings.

2. Concept Drawings
Concept Drawings
2. Concept Drawings

From the concept drawings the paper engineer developed a sketch of what he felt was possible to create with paper.

3. Mock Up
Mock Up
3. Mock Up

The paper engineer began working with shapes and forms to create a physical mock up.

4. Die Lines
Die Lines
4. Die Lines

Once the initial shape was worked out with the paper engineer and the art director, hand drawn die lines (the guides of how the paper will be cut) were created to give the illustrator a framework to draw within.

5. Inspiration
Inspiration
5. Inspiration

Various items were used by the illustrator as reference and inspiration for the creation of the elements in the spread. The paper engineer owns the real-life sheep that are featured on the back of this spread.

6. Drawings
Drawings
6. Drawings

Using the die line guides created by the paper engineer, the illustrator developed drawings for all the elements that could be included in the spread.

7. Cutting Guides
Cutting Guides
7. Cutting Guides

The sketches were scanned and merged electronically by the art director in order to create cutting guides for the paper engineer to make a working mock up.

8. Drawing Assembly
Drawing Assembly
8. Drawing Assembly

Paper engineer, Andrew Baron, works painstakingly to assemble the newest drawings into a mock up for client approval.

9. Mock Up
Mock Up
9. Mock Up

A mid-development mock up with some rough illustrations.

10. Alterations
Alterations
10. Alterations

After seeing how the mock up functions, the paper engineer and art director alter the die lines to create better action and assembly.

11. New Mock Up
New Mock Up
11. New Mock Up

From the revised set of die lines new features and rough illustrations have been added to create a new mock up. Once this was approved by the client, we could move on to final illustration.

12. Final Paintings
Final Paintings
12. Final Paintings

Illustrator Aaron Boyd uses the final hand-drawn die line guides to begin painting the images — eight illustration boards full!

13. Digitally Created
Digitally Created
13. Digitally Created

Once the illustrations are scanned, the art director merges them with the die lines that have now all been created digitally. Then the illustrations are retouched and color corrected to create the best possible visual design.

14. Color Printouts
Color Printouts
14. Color Printouts

From these newly revised digital files, the paper engineer cuts out and assembles color printouts into a final color working mock up.

15. China
China
15. China

The retouched illustrations and die lines were sent to the printing company in China.

16. Blank Dummy
Blank Dummy
16. Blank Dummy

There a team of engineers generated a blank dummy of the spread and create a sample of the paper’s weight and the assembly methods.

17. Andrew Baron
Andrew Baron
17. Andrew Baron

Paper engineer Andrew Baron worked closely with the printer’s engineering team in China to refine the mechanics of the spread.

18. Fine Tuning
Fine Tuning
18. Fine Tuning

Chinese engineers built sample after sample to work out every possible issue.

19. Printing
Printing
19. Printing

Once the final verification samples were approved it came time for printing which was supervised on site by the art director, Drew Foerster.

20. Die Boards
Die Boards
20. Die Boards

During the printing process the die department created the die boards for cutting. They consist of razor sharp blades bent into all the intricate shapes of the paper pieces.

21. Die Cutting
Die Cutting
21. Die Cutting

Once the printing and drying was done, all the sheets were cut on a die press to punch out the individual pieces. Here the design team double-checks the alignment of how the die is striking the paper.

22. Sorting Pieces
Sorting Pieces
22. Sorting Pieces

The die cut sheets are moved to assembly where a group pulls out the pieces from the cuts.

23. Cut Pieces
Cut Pieces
23. Cut Pieces

The cut pieces were then organized into groups.

24. Flow and Efficiency
Flow And Efficiency
24. Flow And Efficiency

Assembly teams work out the flow and efficiency of the process.

25. Spot Check
Spot Check
25. Spot Check

The team supervisors work out problems and spot check assembly.

26. Full Assembly
Full Assembly
26. Full Assembly

Hundreds of highly skilled workers fold and glue the spread together by hand, each worker having a very specific task to complete.

27. The Pop Up Book
The Pop Up Book
27. The Pop Up Book

The completed spread.

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ACUITY’s Storybook Year Ensconced in Smithsonian

ACUITY'S Storybook Year Ensconced in SmithsonianACUITY's 2010 Annual Report is now permanent part of the rare books section of the Cooper-Hewitt collection at the Smithsonian Library.

On April 18, 2011, Paper Engineer Andrew Baron presented a copy of ACUITY's Storybook Year to the Smithsonian along with a presentation on “The Birth of a Corporate Pop-up Book.” Baron, a key member of the team that produced our report, provided a behind-the-scenes look at the creative process behind our one-of-a-kind project.

“The Smithsonian refers to ACUITY's Storybook Year as ‘one of the most beautiful and compelling pop-up books designed to date,’” says Drew Foerster, the project's Art Director. “Given that popup art dates back hundreds of years, that is a remarkable testament to the quality of our project and the lasting value it is likely to have.”

Video Gallery

An Annual Report That Really Pops

Across the entire globe, only a handful of professional Paper Engineers exist who have the skill to turn a two-dimensional illustration into a three-dimensional pop-up book the complexity of ACUITY’s 2010 Annual Report. Each spread is an intricate sculpture of cutouts, folds, tabs, and mechanisms that bring its drawings to life.

ACUITY partnered with one of the top paper engineers in the world: Andrew Baron, who has designed more than 20 books at his Popyrus Studio in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Andrew teamed up with renowned children’s book illustrator Aaron Boyd, who also has 20 book titles to his credit. Coordinating with Drew Foerster, Art Director at DuFour Advertising, the team helped our project take shape – literally – over the span of sixteen months, countless meetings and iterations, and 2,500 emails. The striking end result, ACUITY’s Storybook Year, was distributed to employees and agents at the end of February.

“The purpose of any advertising or marketing material, such as our Annual Report, is to grab somebody’s attention, stop them in their tracks, and have them dwell on it long enough to make a lasting impression,” says Ben Salzmann, President and CEO. “There’s nothing that does that like pop-up art because there’s an intrinsic surprise factor.”

Even though he has designed award-winning books and created eye-catching pop-up advertisements for corporate clients, such as Toyota and Sony, Andrew says that working on ACUITY’s project was a unique experience. “ACUITY’s Storybook Year is the most elaborate three-dimensional book that I’ve engineered in my career,” he says.

Aaron concurs. “This is by far the most fantastic and difficult project I’ve worked on,” he says. “Producing a pop-up book is three to four times the amount of work required for a regular book because it’s three-dimensional, but the end result is worth the effort.”

First-Hand Experience

If the number of Paper Engineers in the world is small, the number of publishers that can create a quality pop-up book is even smaller. “Pop-up books are one of the last handmade, mass-produced products in the world,” Andrew says. “Every step of the production process takes a team of extremely skilled people. Only a handful of specialty printers that have those resources exist, all of which are in the Far East.”

ACUITY chose Toppan Excel, recognized as the premier printer of pop-up books. Andrew and Drew spent several weeks on site in Guangzhou, China, during the critical printing, proofing, and assembly stages. “Because of the time difference and the language barrier, being able to be on site to work with the engineers gave us the opportunity to create a better product while making the production process more efficient. Ultimately it saved weeks of proofing via air mail,” Drew explains.

In late 2010, the assembled books were shipped to the U.S. All that remained was printing the “mini” booklets and financial statement page that detail our 2010 results, and that process was handled locally. “Working on this annual report was almost like creating two separate projects – first producing the actual pop-up book, then going through the whole process of creating a typical annual report to include within it,” says Bret Blizzard, Director - Corporate Communications.

But with the book in hand, the results are well worth the effort. “Everyone loves pop-up books,” says Wally Waldhart, Vice President - Sales and Communications. “ACUITY’s Storybook Year creates a huge ‘wow’ factor, and any time you can draw an audience in, you leave a lasting and positive impression about your company. This will live on and be passed from person to person – it will be a constant reminder that ACUITY stands out from the crowd.”